NEWS & EVENTS

 Kevin's new poetry book is here!
 

Uglynakedbeast

The truth in 140 pages.
 
We are separate from everything around us but a part of it all. The deceptions & manipulations, the self-serving ambition, the arbitrary cruelty, the senseless destruction of the beautiful, as well as the selfless caring, the anonymous acts of goodwill, the striving against what seems insuperable, the hope in the face of a life that is both fragile & finite. We are the endless facets that make up a human being. Like a shattered mirror pieced together, the reflection may be flawed but it's true nonetheless, the cracks in the glass allowing our truest selves to emerge.

 
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 Kevin's new screenplay is finished... 
WEIGHTLESS
 
With action out of James Bond and The Matrix, and a provocative tale of self-discovery with a surprising love story, WEIGHTLESS is a star-making vehicle for the next Keanu Reeves. The screenplay is 118 pages.


DYLAN CAIDO spends his days in a cubicle, with a potted plant and a calendar on the wall of Majorca, Spain. As a financial advisor, he makes it possible for others to live their dreams, but as for himself, his life is safe and without risk. His car is nondescript, yet it gets good mileage. His house is boring and square, yet it’s in a good neighborhood, so it has good resale value. His girlfriend is pleasant and almost pretty (when the light is just right). Yet each day, as he gazes deep into the azure waters of the Mediterranean (on the calendar on the wall), he feels a profound sense of something missing.

Until that one day when everything changes—a website on lucid dreaming he stumbles upon while procrastinating—and his eyes open wide. That night as he falls asleep, he discovers that this, lucid dreaming, is the one thing he is truly good at, and for the first time he leaves his boring life behind. In this brand new dreamworld he can be someone else, someone new. And he finds a fearlessness he never knew he possessed, as each dream becomes an adventure, a greater risk to be taken, another dance with danger. Dylan’s days are spent longing for the night. And each night he goes to a place where the rules no longer apply, this weightless world of his dreams, and each morning he wakes to a world without consequence. But can there be such a place? And can a world of fantasy where every wish is granted be better than that which is truly real? As one of the characters says, “Here’s to the real, the unreal, and knowing the difference.”

 
 Kevin's new novel is here! 
LIVE NUDE GIRLS  is a book of words and pictures (advertisements, to be exact). It’s a postmodern exploration of identity, hope, inevitability, and how practically everything in life is a Schrödinger's Cat experiment. And it’s funny, serious, and may even be controversial, with strippers and sex and a Holocaust story that’s never been told.

Meet Daphne Olivia Baranchek:  24 year-old bisexual stripper, ADHD-addled misfit genius, MFA dropout, and refugee from East Berlin, New Jersey who may just be the female Holden Caulfield.
 
The best review EVER:  Click HERE.

A brief excerpt
 
So what is it about trying to get to know someone? Christ, I mean I wish I could escape this body and float in space and be part of… I don’t know, the consciousness of it all, like the quantum physicists say, that we’re floating invisibilities, everything a part of everything else. But these bodies. They keep us separate. They keep us trapped within ourselves with these scars that are nobody else’s. It seems like I get a glimpse of it now and then, those rare moments, those seconds when I just happen to turn to the side and see something without looking and… well, once I think about it it’s gone gone gone. But it leaves an imprint or a shadow or that infinite space that exists for an instant when someone you love (or you hate) leaves the room. Perhaps that’s why poetry exists, because when it’s good it’s about those empty spaces.
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  Kevin's new teleplay is finished... 

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEREWOLF
 (TV Series/Feature Film)
 

The winter at Valley Forge was the low point in the war for General George Washington and the Continental Army. They had suffered a string of demoralizing defeats and the people were losing faith, the troops despondent. Washington didn’t think they’d make it through the frigid winter, when from the Black Forest in Prussia came Baron Friedrich Von Steuben, the military genius who was to whip the Rebel troops into shape. But what he brought with him from the Old World was something altogether different, something no one could have imagined. An ancient curse born of evil, and realized on the full moon in the shape of the werewolf.

GEORGE WASHINGTON WEREWOLF is the story of what could have happened if the myths were true. And how an accident and a curse turned the tide of war in favor of the Rebels in this battle for independence. Epic in scope, with a sweeping cast of characters from both sides:  barefoot Colonial soldiers, an imperious dwarf, a villainous Aaron Burr, Redcoats and Loyalists, prostitutes and barflies, heroes and traitors. And through it all, George Washington, trying to hold onto his humanity in the most desperate of times and win the war, while battling the inhuman face of the beast within.

 "MUDVILLE" & VIOLENCE IN AMERICA  

 
 
MUDVILLE, the recent novel by Kevin Postupack (Deep Kiss Press), is a book steeped in violence, and more specifically, violence in America, because Americans love violence. They love guns, big pickups, fast food, fist fights, and Jesus (although I’m not sure how Jesus fits into that group). Postupack explained that he wanted everything about the book to be violent. The subject matter ,of course, from the most brutal and repellent acts (as hard to write as they were to read) down to the seemingly insignificant “casual” exchanges (the subtle violence and one-upmanship of words). But also, the way the book was written. It’s not an easy book, unless you’re willing to accept it, like the South itself, where MUDVILLE, for the most part, takes place. A lost world of undercurrents and contradictions, of antebellum ideas and hot thick Southern air filled with God and gunpowder. It’s been twenty-five years since the Civil War ended and the novel begins, the war itself (and the South’s ignominious defeat) still fresh in everyone’s minds, particularly the population of Mudville, Arkansas. It’s a powder keg with a very long fuse that’s been lit. It’s a wagon hauling nitroglycerin with the horses racing out of control. The world of MUDVILLE is a place where violence is in the air we breathe, in the pores of our skin, and in Postupack’s world, in the words themselves, in the style and voice. A harsh voice to be sure, stripped of superfluity (even the commas are absent, to be replaced by space where the winds of the Dust Bowl blow through ‘til you can taste it in your mouth, the dust as you say the words. And yes, MUDVILLE is a book that’s meant to be read aloud, that’s meant to be heard). And if you are able to immerse yourself in its voice, then its poetry can be realized. A poetry that’s not sentimental, but is full of rust and gunsmoke and relentless summer heat and skin cracked and desiccated from a merciless sun beating down through bullet holes. The question that’s asked is whether it’s possible for absolution in a world abandoned to such violence and despair. A world where even God has it in for us, where each moment he plots our destruction. But there are moments… After a lynching and a particularly heinous act, James Flynn the anti-hero removes his Ku Klux Klan hood and notices the stars, the crisp night air, and for a moment he is in tune with all things. And the reader is appalled, yet can’t help but notice a glimmer of humanity. Here again, the contradictions. Or James’s sadness beyond despair when his son is killed, when he tries to obliterate the world that somehow let this happen. And then later, a kind of elation as he watches a meteor shower overhead “like a kinda fireworks display.”

Then in the present day, when Jimmy Flynn is drawn into this same world of violence that was his grandfather’s legacy. How seamlessly he’s assimilated, as he “feels the power of the rifle as the bullets ripped through barn boards; this power that has nothing to do with character or merit or intelligence or creativity but is primal and deadly and comes from simply holding a loaded gun in your hands.” And in the end, God has the last laugh, as the sum total of human endeavor becomes a country song sung off-key about “Heaven’s golden shores.” MUDVILLE is a novel that offers no answers, but rather, is a spotlight shining a harsh, uncomfortable beam on those places we’d rather keep hidden, but given the right time and place, become us, become who we are.

Max Perkins
London, June 2012
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copyright 2019  by Kevin Postupack