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Of Blazing Diamonds

Updated: Dec 7, 2020


“Can I ask you something?”

    “Of course, Jack. My new Jack.”

    “Your mask…”

    “Why do I wear it?”

    “Yes.”

    “It’s… too much for some.”

    “Too much?” There's a pause. “The Medusa?

    “Something like that.”

  Jack looks at her hair. It flows to her waist, blonde as straw, with beads and flowers in the strands. 

    “I don't see any snakes.”

    “Snakes, no.”

“But…”

“Mirrors,” she says.

    “Mirrors?

    “When people look at me, they see themselves. But it’s who they really are, not the mask.”

“The mask?”

“The mask they wear. To some, they're not prepared for it. What they keep hidden. To others, it’s terrifying.” She looks at Jack’s face. “However, If you're in the process of becoming, then…”

“Becoming?”

Her eyes light up. “Then something unimagined may be revealed.”

    “Hmm… Has Jack seen you? I mean, himself?”

    “My Jack? My first Jack?… Yes, he has.”

    Jack Odessa takes a breath. “Then I'd like to see.”

With slender fingers adorned with rings, she softly removes her mask. And what Jack sees is blinding. Facets of light blazing diamond-like, flashing reflections and images that are essence. A crackling collision of every sound since the first sound. Before harmony and dissonance emerged like two great gods, forever at war. But a war that becomes a dance or an all-out brawl. A push-pull of balance on a tightrope, teetering above the great scattering (when we’re one at last, like salt dissolved in galactic soup). All his life, Jack’s had a recurring dream: a purity complete as a black canopy, starless, awaiting the first star. And in the wait was the luscious lusciousness and lusciosity! The not-yet to become the is! Then the was, the denouement. How quickly it passes once potential arrives. To not quicken it seems to be the key. To let it cover you, then breathe ever deep within the waiting.


(an excerpt from Kunundrum's new novel, Blood of the Sun)

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—copyright 2019, 2020, 2021 by Kevin Postupack, Kevin Kunundrum